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Newspaper Archive of
The New Era Paper
Sweet Home, Oregon
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February 22, 2012     The New Era Paper
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February 22, 2012
 

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Page 4 ... COMMUNITV OPINION 1t ie r. - February 22, 2012 iol?. T I, ; $///z /z, -//.zk'// February 22, 1962 Fire destroyed the barn and equitement on the Everett-Ambro- sek place on Ames Creek road last Sunday night. Firemen were called to the barn at 7:30 p.m.. and when they arrived the barn had been completely leveled by the blaze. Hay as well as farm machinery was destroyed along with the barn causing $4.000 in damage. A dispatch of mail from Sweet Home on Sundays and holidays has been established, according to post master Mrs. Nealia Haven. The new service went into effect last Sunday. Jerry Wiles.3-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Wiles, Foster, was released from Langmack hos- pital on Monday following treat- ment for scalded feet. The youngster climbed into the kitchen sink at their home. and turned on the hot water faucet. scaulding both feet. February 25, 1987 Some wonder if vehicles have declared open warfare on buildings in the Sweet Home area. in the last six weeks at least six different vehicles have been involved in accidents whose main targts have been buildings. From Our Files Looking back on more than 80 years of coverage in east Linn County... The latest accident report- ed was about 7 a.m. Feb. 18. as Charles Hudson Butcher III was ar- rested after his 1977 Chevrolet hit the Magic Scissors Beauty shop. According to Officer Bob Worthington. Butcher had been sleeping in his vehicle, in the park- ing lot of the Frontier, then decided to pull out into Main Street. "For some reason he never made it." stated Worthington. Damage was estimated at $1.500. The Sweet Home Christian School will close its doors this June after ten years of operation. This announcement was made by SHCS principal Roger Swigart and Rev. Mark McCartin. pastor of Community Chapel. "It is hard to see the school close" said Wwigart. He was one of the original members on the board. How far are we willing to go for our youngsters? Now that the Sweet Home District #55 School Board has de- cided to institute a four-day school week next year. what's next? As a community, we can re- spond, individually or collectively, in a number of ways: getting mad, giving a collective shoulder shrug and hoping for the best. or we cart take steps to make something hap- pen - we can get creative. Though we, here at The New Era, believed the four-day week was the lesser of two evils - the other being a litany of likely staff layoffs, cuts to nonacademic pro- grams, reduction in services, larger classrooms, reduction of athletics. cuts to music, reducing electives EDIT0000)00IAL and more furlough days, it still has a lot of potential to be an evil. For those whose paychecks will be shrunk'by this move, it's going to be tough. That was our biggest concern with the four-day week: the impact on the classi- fied folks. As many of us already know, thanks to reduced incomes due to the economic difficulties we've experienced, it's something we wouldn't wish on anyone. But there are other potential difficulties here: the impact on our i00hr A locally owned newspaper founded Sept. 27, 1929 Scott and Miriam Swanson, Co-Publishers .sweethomenews.cem Office: i313 MainSt., Sweet Home, Oregon Mailing address: The New Era, Box 39, Sweet Home, OR, 97386 Phone: (541) 367-2135 Fax: (541) 367-2137 WHO WE ARE Scott Swanson, Editor/Co-Publisher scott@sweethomenews.com Sean C. Morgan, Staff Writer sean@sweethomenews.com Miriam Swanson, Advertising Manager, Co-Publisher midam@sweethomenews.com Chnsty Keeney, Classified Ads classifieds@sweethomenews.com Firiel Severns; Advertising Sales firiel@sweethomenews.com The New Era (USPS 379-100)is published each Wednesday. Periodical postage paid at the Sweet Home, Ore., 97386 Post Office. Postmaster: Please send address changes to The New Era, Box 39, Sweet Home, Oregon 97386 SUBSCRIPTIONS n Linn County: $32 Elsewhere: $40 Snowbird: $38 NEWS QUESTIONS/TIPS Call {541) 367-2135 or e-mail newssweethomenews.com community's youngsters - particu- larly those whose families can't give them the personal, consistent attention that might be ideal in this situation, due to work demands, family dynamics and other factor. What happens next will de- pend on how we, as individuals and as a community, decide we are going to respond. What the school district and local parents, and others who care about kids in our district, need to do is get together and figure out what potential problems we need to get proactive about. Which youngsters are most at risk in this situation? What are the biggest risks - more mischief due to excessive free time? Educational difficulties due to lack of class time? Substance abuse? Obesity? If you Google "'effects on stu- dents of a four-day school week" you'll see a wide variety of articles that generally boil down to the same conclusion: Four-day weeks seem to harm some students, seem to help others, and appear to have little or no effect on the educational progress of the rest. The fact is, we want all of the kids in our community, particu- larly those who come from chal- lenged backgrounds - little support or encouragement at home, lives disrupted by circumstances beyond their control, maybe personalities that easily veer toward bad deci- sions - to exit our schools ready to successfully take on the chal- lenges of adult life. The fact that classroom activities are not held on Fridays could actually be a positive for many of those kids - as long as we can find a way to keep them ac- tive in positive ways. So what could we do? Some. of course, could take advantage of the extra-curricular activities offered for older kids by local preschools. The Boys and Girls Club. which, as we reported recently, has instituted behavior requirements modeled on those already in use in our schools, is another option. These cost money, but they're positive alternatives, Church youth ministries could assume a role in providing solu- tions. Instead of, or possibly in WRITE A LETTER We encour mail, e-mail, sent to news@sweethomenews.com. letter will not be published. ) length restriction, but letters may beedited for length and all t for libelous content. We discourage letters that attack been exhausted in previous letters will be edited accordingly. addition to. Daily Vacation Bible School in the summers, how about Friday activities throughout the year? Youth sports programs could hold concentrated skill develop- ment for kids on Fridays. High school and junior high students might also volunteer in some of the activities we've men- tioned. Organizations that need vol- unteers, such as the Beautification Committee, the Parks Commission or the Trails Committee, might be able to put together some programs to give some of our younger gen- eration investment in the commu- nity. The School Board should look into options that might expand work-study opportunities for high school students to volunteer (or work) at local businesses. With the economy the way it is. the vol- unteer angle might be more work- able if it passed muster from state regulators, but it could be a great opportunity for students to gain practical experience and learn the pleasure of productive accomplish- ment - particularly if they are not used to that. Activities that convince some reluctant students to even continue school - music, arts, clubs, sports - and even classes could be held. maybe only informally, on Fridays in a productive way if adults who care about kids are willing to de- vote time to helping them become responsible and productive citizens. which is what a lot of those activi- ties teach. Teachers are still getting paid. What if they, like many of our coaches, used some of that time in productive, non-classroom activi- See Editorial, page 5